Nick Akerman

Prior to private practice Nick served as a federal prosecutor. He was an Assistant United States Attorney in the Southern District of New York, where he prosecuted a wide array of white collar criminal matters, including bank frauds, bankruptcy frauds, stock frauds, complex financial frauds, environmental and tax crimes. Nick was also an Assistant Special Watergate Prosecutor with the Watergate Special Prosecution Force under Archibald Cox and Leon Jaworski.Nick has over 30 years of experience in helping clients respond to government investigations and prosecutions and assisting corporate clients prevent and respond to internal thefts and outside hackers. He is a nationally recognized expert on computer crime and the protection of competitively sensitive information and computer data. Nick regularly obtains injunctions for his clients under the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act in various federal courts around the country requiring computer thieves to return stolen computer data and prohibiting the dissemination of the data to competitors. He also guides clients in developing systems, policies and protocols to protect computer data.Nick speaks and writes regularly on protecting computer data, including in his regular computer data column for the National Law Journal. He has been a featured quoted expert on computer fraud and computer security issues in the New York Times, USA Today, the San Jose Mercury News, the Boston Globe, the St. Louis Dispatch, the Sacramento Bee, Forbes, ComputerWorld, CFO Magazine, CNET, CNET Japan, ZDNet, MSN, Internet Week and the Weekly Homeland Security Newsletter. His blog can be found at http://computerfraud.us.

SEC Report on Internal Controls, Cybersecurity

Cyber-security has become – or perhaps should be – a key area of concern for every enterprise. The risks are substantial for the firm, its shareholders, executives and customers as recent cases illustrate. Every enterprise large or small is a potential victim. The losses can and often are substantial not just in dollars but also in trust, customers and more. The Commission has issued guidance. The agency has also brought enforcement actions.

Now, however, the Commission has issued a report based on nine investigations of firms involved in a variety of industries, cautioning about cyber risks in the context of the firm’s obligations to maintain proper internal controls. Report of Investigation Pursuant to Section 21(a) of the Exchange Act Regarding Certain Cyber-Related Frauds Perpetrated Against Public Companies, October 16, 2018. 

Extraterritorial Application of The GDPR

By:  Ron Moscona, Jamie Nafziger and Clint Conner The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which is billed as the most important development in data privacy regulation in at least 20 years, arrived with a bang in May of this year and companies have been scrambling to implement compliance measures that will avoid its stiff… Read More

Will California’s New Privacy Law be Preempted? Federal Hearings and Public Comments Begin

Although numerous attempts have been made to pass a comprehensive U.S. privacy law over the years, this one might actually succeed. Efforts have begun on multiple fronts. From Senate Commerce Committee hearings to several federal agencies vying for which will lead a federal regulatory effort, privacy is a hot topic in Washington, DC. Businesses should take immediate action to enter the discussions if they have not already done so. Comments on a proposed federal framework are due October 26, 2018. The Commerce Committee will hold additional hearings in October. Industry is coming to the table in an attempt to avoid facing a jumble of inconsistent state privacy laws.

Digital Assets a Focus Point for Regulators

By:  Genna Garver, Daniel Baich, Kimberly Frumkin As investor interest in cryptocurrencies has picked up, government agencies and non-governmental organizations tasked with protecting investors are taking a harder look at these virtual investment products. While the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), and the National Futures Association… Read More

Will California’s New Privacy Law be Preempted? Federal Hearings and Public Comments Begin

Although numerous attempts have been made to pass a comprehensive U.S. privacy law over the years, this one might actually succeed.  Efforts have begun on multiple fronts.  From Senate Commerce Committee hearings to several federal agencies vying for which will lead a federal regulatory effort, privacy is a hot topic in Washington, DC.  Businesses should take immediate action to enter the discussions if they have not already done so.  Comments on a proposed federal framework are due October 26, 2018.  The Commerce Committee will hold additional hearings in October.  Industry is coming to the table in an attempt to avoid facing a jumble of inconsistent state privacy laws.

Updated Alert: Governor Brown Signs Amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018

By:  Joseph Lynyak, Robert Cattanach, and Sam Bolstad 1. Introduction On June 28, 2018, the California Legislature unanimously passed, and the Governor immediately signed, a sweeping expansion of data privacy protections for residents of California.1 Assembly Bill No. 375, entitled the “California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018” (the “CCPA”), goes far beyond current U.S. privacy protections,… Read More

Claimed Failure to Disclose GDPR’s Collateral Impact Leads to Class Action Against Nielsen Holdings

In what could be a harbinger of things to come for business models negatively impacted by the throttling of data flow under the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”), Nielsen Holdings (“Nielsen”) was named in a putative class action complaint on August 22, 2018, for allegedly misrepresenting the anticipated effects of GDPR on Nielsen’s business model.  Importantly, the class action takes aim not at Nielsen’s ability to comply with GDPR, but rather the effects of GDPR on the big data platforms used by Nielsen.  Nielsen provides consumer market analytics, particularly regarding digital media and e-commerce.  When big data platforms and associated analytic providers began restricting access to consumer data in order to comply with GDPR, it apparently negatively impacted Nielsen’s business model.  Those effects surfaced in Nielsen’s latest Q2 financial report, causing its stock to drop by more than 25 percent, and giving rise to the class action claims.

Financial Industry Groups Should Have a Pulse on the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018

Financial institutions that are grappling with how the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”)may impact their U.S. operations should also be keeping a close eye on the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (“CCPA”).  The CCPA, or Assembly Bill (“AB”) No. 375, which was passed on June 28, 2018 and is set to take effect in 2020, mirrors some GDPR protections by providing California residents greater control over the dissemination of their personal data, including the option of barring companies from selling their data. 

California Unanimously Enacts Comprehensive Digital Privacy Law

Back in 1972, California voters added privacy to the state constitution’s list of inalienable rights. On June 28, 2018, the California Legislature enacted and Governor Brown signed the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018. The new Privacy Law creates one of the most comprehensive frameworks for regulating digital privacy in the United States. 

Full Akerman: Trump’s attempt to manipulate the justice system is one big obstruction

Recent discussion on MSNBC regarding Trump’s obstruction of justice Tweet containing: Full Akerman: Trump’s attempt to manipulate the justice system is one big obstruction via @Yahoo Watergate special assistant attorney Nick Akerman explains how Trump’s dealings with the Russia probe and justice department show a clear pattern of behavioR.   Watergate special assistant attorney Nick… Read More

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